Note: Grade appeals go to the instructor, Rob Harrison robh@uw.edu (or zabow@u.washington.edu). Please do not send to eschelp and make sure and put the information we need in the subject line (detailed below). Follow this procedure as exactly as possible or we might not get the email in our priority box. Thanks.

Question: What is the ESRM100 Grade Appeal Policy?
 
Answer:
Grading quizzes, exams and projects fairly is a difficult job, and we fully realize mistakes will be made, as we have made some big ones in the past.  Please make sure and check over any grades given to you and ask us if there is a question of being assigned the correct grade. 

However, we also realize that it is unfair to give more credit that is warranted by the answer given.  In ESRM100, requesting additional points isn't a fishing expedition, so you need to demonstrate to me that you actually did answer the question better than I thought.

The following policy applies to asking for more credit for any work done in the class:

1) You will become the "grader" for your answer. If there was a question on the exam, start by rewriting the full question and the possible answers.  If it was a project, We'll need a copy of your work. If the question is about a volunteer project, and the confirmation of work is the problem, We'll need the organization, dates of work, and the name and email address or phone of the person that organized the volunteer project. 

2) Write down your SPECIFIC reasoning for more points than you were initially given. You should explain exactly why the grade wasn't correct, and how an answer or work was worth more credit than credit given. Quote material from your work and show me how it was graded incorrectly. If you state that "friends" got higher grades for worse or similar material as part of your appeal, We will likely reject your appeal without reading it further. Arguing that the comments from the reviewer, which are likely to be very brief, and are only part of the basis for your grade, is also not going to get much traction. The job is yours to prove to us that your grade was not correct and should be higher by using your material, not comments from other's. We want you to show me that by citing specific material in your work of extremely high quality and to demonstrate clearly how you deserve a higher grade. 

3) State exactly how many points you feel the answer deserved.  We will only give that amount of points or nothing.  You could break down specific parts of the answer by the amounts of point, with the total not exceeding the number of points for that question. In the case of an exam, you cannot receive full credit for a wrong answer, so don't ask for full credit if your answer wasn't correct. In the case of an exam, you absolutely will not receive full credit for something based on your opinion. References to information in the book, my online lectures, and other sources of published information can work.

4) For appeals of exam questions, please include all information in the body of an email.  If appealing material that was submitted with attached files (i.e. reports), then include the original file.  For appeals of projects, only attach the project. Put all justification for the increased grade in your email. Tell me the original grade, the grade you think you should earn, and specifically why the original wasn't fair and the appeal grade is. Do not overreach. It is very difficult for a student to earn a nearly perfect grade. Remember that a 94% is a 4.0. It will be very hard to justify a grade higher than a 94% unless it is truly outstanding and you can demonstrate that to me. This is the University of Washington, and outstanding writing, ideas and assimilated material are the norm, and graded accordingly. If there is a single grammatical mistake, please don't appeal for an "A" grade, as we won't give it. Your opinion in your original submission is great, but unless you have substantial environmental science concepts in your work, it doesn't merit an "A" or even a "B" grade.

5) Do not combine appeals for multiple requirements (i.e. exams, projects, extra credit), in the same email.

Submit your reasoning by email with the subject heading "ESRM100 GradeAppeal-Exam1-your name-0000000."

For instance, "Exam2" would be for an exam2 appeal, etc. for the item you are appealing. "0000000" would be your student number

to robh@uw.edu or zabow@u.washington.edu

If your appeal includes showing that you actually did some work that isn't shown, then please follow a similar format, and include copies of all work previously submitted.